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Alison Gillespie

Writer

Washington, DC

Alison Gillespie

I write about nature, urban ecology, green energy, farming and other environmental issues. I like to capture the moments when wildlife and people intersect in unexpected places. I also like making science topics accessible and easy-to-read. My award-winning book, Hives in the City, tells the story of urban beekeepers struggling to keep their bees alive in the Mid-Atlantic.

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Putting Rural Schools to the Test

Bandwidth demands in the current test-heavy climate are challenging rural-school administrators. How can your telco help students succeed?
Rural Telecom magazine Link to Story
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Native Ground Bees: Helpful, not Hurtful

Experts say rather than reaching for insecticide, growers should be grateful when these native bees arrive.
Modern Farmer Link to Story
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Giga-Gobbledygook: Overcoming Customer Confusion About Gig Services

Rural telecom companies discuss educating customers about their choices.
Rural Telecom magazine Link to Story
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A New Weapon in the War On Weeds: Flamethrowers

Long used in agriculture, land managers are now wondering whether cooking weeds to death is better than pesticides
Smithsonian Link to Story
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There's a Secret World Under the Snow, and It's In Trouble »

How do animals survive under the snow? We're only beginning to understand—just as climate change may rewrite everything
Smithsonian Link to Story
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The Future of Food Coloring May Be Very Slimy

Algae has been repeatedly touted as the great new super crop. Some see abundant promise in the idea of growing and making food, medicines, vitamin supplements, and biofuels from the slimy stuff. Now, Johan Andersen Ranberg, a researcher from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, is going to investigate one more possible application: food coloring.
Modern Farmer Link to Story
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These Creative Wind Turbines Will Have You Rethinking What You Know About Wind Power

Wind turbines don't have to all look the same. Here are some that are helping cities go green—and look like art in the process
Smithsonian Link to Story
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What’s the Final Verdict on the Wildly Popular Flow Hive?

Jason Allen-Rouman was excited when he learned he’d be one of the first people in North America to receive a Flow Hive for his backyard. He’d been dreaming about getting an apiary set up for years, and a recent move from downtown San Francisco to a house in Washington, D.C., meant he could finally make his fantasy a reality.
Modern Farmer Link to Story
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Releasing Invasive Plant Strangleholds in Urban Parks

In many US parks, invasive exotic vines have a stranglehold on trees. Those invasives don’t just look bad – they often support little in the way of native wildlife, and can limit some of the most beneficial ecological aspects of urban forests.
GreeningtheCity.com Link to Story
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Rebranding as You Move Toward a Broadband Future

Rebranding doesn't just mean a new name. Externally, it can mean reassuring your customers and enticing them to stick around as you grow. Internally it can demand a new approach to customer service and staff management. Learn about the challenges telcos have faced as they've changed their brands to better fit a broadband future.
Rural Telecom magazine Link to Story
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Inner City Farmers May Have Toxic Soils on Their Hands

Lead is a particular risk as people try to turn potentially contaminated urban sites into productive and sustainable farms
Smithsonian Link to Story
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An insider's view of walkability in the District

By many people’s accounting, D.C. remains one of the most walkable cities in the United States. Contributors to travel websites, for example, regularly remark on how easy it is for visitors to get from one sightseeing location to another without the need for a car. Walk Score has given the city a score of 74 (out of a possible 100) for being “very walkable” because most errands in many neighborhoods can be accomplished on foot.
ElevationDC Link to Story

About

Alison Gillespie

I live in Silver Spring, Maryland, just outside of Washington, DC.

In addition to writing about science and the environment for various publications, I sometimes write copy for non-profit groups and a few select trade organizations.

My non-fiction book about urban beekeepers and their bees was published in 2014 and is for sale online and in select bookstores. You can find more details at the book's website: www.hivesinthecity.com.

Before going freelance I worked for several non-profit organizations, writing newsletter articles, annual reports, and press releases. I also maintained press databases and pitched stories to editors.

My blog, www.whereyouareplanted.com, provides practical advice for those who want to welcome wildlife to their own urban green spaces.

When not at my computer writing, I like to hike and explore the streams of Maryland. I am a passionate gardener who likes to watch the bees land on flower tops in the summer and the birds find berries in the winter. My ultimate gardening dream is to attract frogs and toads to my urban pond.

I'm eager to take on new freelance assignments, and available to give talks about my book.